Action Nerd!

"We’re action nerds... adventure nerds. Nerds of romance."

I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes.

Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You’re doing things you’ve never done before, and more importantly, you’re Doing Something.

So that’s my wish for you, and all of us, and my wish for myself. Make New Mistakes. Make glorious, amazing mistakes. Make mistakes nobody’s ever made before. Don’t freeze, don’t stop, don’t worry that it isn’t good enough, or it isn’t perfect, whatever it is: art, or love, or work or family or life.

Whatever it is you’re scared of doing, Do it.

Make your mistakes, next year and forever.

http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2011/12/my-new-year-wish.html (via neil-gaiman)

fishingboatproceeds:

There is a lot of suck in the world, and I don’t wish to minimize it.

But there is also a lot to be hopeful and excited about on this planet these days, and by some measures, 2014 might just be the best year ever for humans.

Yay!

STRFKR, I love you

HOW is your music so good? UGH. Four solid albums, it’s unreal.

Thank you for introducing me to Alan Watts (paradigm shattering) and for making the best study/reading/grading/cooking/dancing/living soundtrack.

Seriously, thank you.

“Many adults are put off when youngsters pose scientific questions. Children ask why the sun is yellow, or what a dream is, or how deep you can dig a hole, or when is the world’s birthday, or why we have toes. Too many teachers and parents answer with irritation or ridicule, or quickly move on to something else. Why adults should pretend to omniscience before a five-year-old, I can’t for the life of me understand. What’s wrong with admitting that you don’t know? Children soon recognize that somehow this kind of question annoys many adults. A few more experiences like this, and another child has been lost to science. There are many better responses. If we have an idea of the answer, we could try to explain. If we don’t, we could go to the encyclopedia or the library. Or we might say to the child: “I don’t know the answer. Maybe no one knows. Maybe when you grow up, you’ll be the first to find out.”

– Carl Sagan (via scienceing)

fortswinwars:

Charleston dance video with Daft Punk’s Around the World dubbed in. 

Friggin. Awesome.

Everything that is old is new again (and vice versa)

“When public schools are judged by how much art and music they have, by how many science experiments their students perform, by how much time they leave for recess and play, and by how much food they grow rather than how many tests they administer, then I will be confident that we are preparing our students for a future where they will be creative participants and makers of history rather than obedient drones for the ruling economic elite.”

Mark Naison, Fordham professor and social justice activist

jtotheizzoe:

You’re on to something, Maria Mitchell.
Fill your brain with a boatload of inspiration from this pioneering astronomer at Brain Pickings. She had enough inspirational words to fill three walls, and to inspire thousands.

jtotheizzoe:

You’re on to something, Maria Mitchell.

Fill your brain with a boatload of inspiration from this pioneering astronomer at Brain Pickings. She had enough inspirational words to fill three walls, and to inspire thousands.

jtotheizzoe:

Gratitude - A Film By Louie Schwartzberg

This little girl’s opening monologue should be engraved on a monument somewhere.

And it only gets better from there. All the smiles.

If you do nothing else but to cultivate that response to the great gift that this unique day is, if you learn to respond as if it were the first day of your life, and the very last day, then you will have spent this day very well.